People living in Wakefield need a 53% pay rise to afford to buy a home

The average full-time worker in Wakefield now needs a staggering pay rise of 53% just to afford a mortgage on a typical home in the region, a new report from the National Housing Federation reveals today.

According to the ‘Yorkshire and the Humber Home Truths 2017/18’ report, those earning any less than £36,516 a year are now priced out of buying the average home in the area.

Despite regional house prices being lower than the national average, the combination of low wages, an above-average unemployment rate and job insecurity is resulting in an acute housing crisis in the area.

Local salaries have failed to keep up with house prices, meaning the average home in Sheffield – costing £159,757 – is now over seven times the average yearly income of £23,873.

The report also exposes the severe shortfall of new homes in recent years. Between 2012 and 2016, there were nearly 36,000 too few homes built across Yorkshire and the Humber to keep up with demand, with West Yorkshire alone being 22,094 homes short.

South Yorkshire Housing Association has plans to build 1,180 homes by 2021, and in 2017 alone built 73 new homes in the region.

Tony Stacey, Chief Executive of South Yorkshire Housing Association, said: Tony Stacey, Chief Executive of South Yorkshire Housing Association, said: “We tend to talk as though there is just one housing crisis, but it takes many different forms. It is not just about the impossibility of affording a home in London or people sleeping rough.

“For far too many local people, affordable housing is simply out of reach. We should expect more from both national and local politicians to find solutions that work for all sections of society in Wakefield.”

To read the Yorkshire and the Humber Home Truths 2017/18 report in full visit www.housing.org.uk/hometruths

People living in Doncaster need a 41% pay rise to afford to buy a home

The average full-time worker in Doncaster now needs a staggering pay rise of 41% just to afford a mortgage on a typical home in the region, a new report from the National Housing Federation reveals today.

According to the ‘Yorkshire and the Humber Home Truths 2017/18’ report, those earning any less than £33,271 a year are now priced out of buying the average home in the area.

Despite regional house prices being lower than the national average, the combination of low wages, an above-average unemployment rate and job insecurity is resulting in an acute housing crisis in the area.

Local salaries have failed to keep up with house prices, meaning the average home in Doncaster – costing £145,562 – is now over six times the average yearly income of £23,499.

The report also exposes the severe shortfall of new homes in recent years. Between 2012 and 2016, there were nearly 36,000 too few homes built across Yorkshire and the Humber to keep up with demand, with South Yorkshire alone being 6,500 homes short.

South Yorkshire Housing Association has plans to build 1,180 homes by 2021, and in 2017 alone built 73 new homes in the region.

Tony Stacey, Chief Executive of South Yorkshire Housing Association, said: “We tend to talk as though there is just one housing crisis, but it takes many different forms. It is not just about the impossibility of affording a home in London or people sleeping rough.

“For far too many local people, affordable housing is simply out of reach. We should expect more from both national and local politicians to find solutions that work for all sections of society here in Doncaster.”

To read the Yorkshire and the Humber Home Truths 2017/18 report in full visit www.housing.org.uk/hometruths

People living in Rotherham need a 49% pay rise to afford to buy a home

The average full-time worker in Rotherham now needs a staggering pay rise of 49% just to afford a mortgage on a typical home in the region, a new report from the National Housing Federation reveals today.

According to the ‘Yorkshire and the Humber Home Truths 2017/18’ report, those earning any less than £34,502 a year are now priced out of buying the average home in the area.

Despite regional house prices being lower than the national average, the combination of low wages, an above-average unemployment rate and job insecurity is resulting in an acute housing crisis in the area.

Local salaries have failed to keep up with house prices, meaning the average home in Rotherham – costing £150,946 – is now over six times the average yearly income of £23,114.

The report also exposes the severe shortfall of new homes in recent years. Between 2012 and 2016, there were nearly 36,000 too few homes built across Yorkshire and the Humber to keep up with demand, with South Yorkshire alone being 6,500 homes short.

The housing association sector is working to end the region’s crisis, completing nearly 1,800 new homes and starting work on over 1,600 more during 2015/16.

South Yorkshire Housing Association has plans to build 1,180 homes by 2021, and in 2017 alone built 73 new homes in the region, including new homes on the White City estate in Maltby.

Tony Stacey, Chief Executive of South Yorkshire Housing Association, said: “We tend to talk as though there is just one housing crisis, but it takes many different forms. It is not just about the impossibility of affording a home in London or people sleeping rough.

“For far too many local people, affordable housing is simply out of reach. We should expect more from both national and local politicians to find solutions that work for all sections of society here in Rotherham.”

To read the Yorkshire and the Humber Home Truths 2017/18 report in full visit www.housing.org.uk/hometruths

People living in Selby need a 68% pay rise to afford to buy a home

The average full-time worker in Selby now needs a staggering pay rise of 68% just to afford a mortgage on a typical home in the region, a new report from the National Housing Federation reveals today.

According to the ‘Yorkshire and the Humber Home Truths 2017/18’ report, those earning any less than £48,601 a year are now priced out of buying the average home in the area.

Despite regional house prices being lower than the national average, the combination of low wages, an above-average unemployment rate and job insecurity is resulting in an acute housing crisis in the area.

Local salaries have failed to keep up with house prices, meaning the average home in Sheffield – costing £212,627 – is now over seven times the average yearly income of £28,782.

The report also exposes the severe shortfall of new homes in recent years. Between 2012 and 2016, there were over 36,000 too few homes built across Yorkshire and the Humber to keep up with demand, with North Yorkshire alone having 1,027 homes short.

South Yorkshire Housing Association has plans to build 1,180 homes by 2021, and in 2017 alone built 73 new homes in the region.

Tony Stacey, Chief Executive of South Yorkshire Housing Association, said: “We tend to talk as though there is just one housing crisis, but it takes many different forms. It is not just about the impossibility of affording a home in London or people sleeping rough.

“For far too many local people, affordable housing is simply out of reach. We should expect more from both national and local politicians to find solutions that work for all sections of society in Selby.”

To read the Yorkshire and the Humber Home Truths 2017/18 report in full visit www.housing.org.uk/hometruths

People living in Barnsley need a 26% pay rise to afford to buy a home

The average full-time worker in Barnsley now needs a staggering pay rise of 26% just to afford a mortgage on a typical home in the region, a new report from the National Housing Federation reveals today.

According to the ‘Yorkshire and the Humber Home Truths 2017/18’ report, those earning any less than £30,702 a year are now priced out of buying the average home in the area.

Despite regional house prices being lower than the national average, the combination of low wages, an above-average unemployment rate and job insecurity is resulting in an acute housing crisis in the area.

Local salaries have failed to keep up with house prices, meaning the average home in Barnsley – costing £134,323 – is now over five and a half times the average yearly income of £24,367.

The report also exposes the severe shortfall of new homes in recent years. Between 2012 and 2016, there were nearly 36,000 too few homes built across Yorkshire and the Humber to keep up with demand, with South Yorkshire alone being 6,500 homes short.

South Yorkshire Housing Association has plans to build 1,180 homes by 2021, and in 2017 alone built 73 new homes in the region.

Tony Stacey, Chief Executive of South Yorkshire Housing Association, said: “We tend to talk as though there is just one housing crisis, but it takes many different forms. It is not just about the impossibility of affording a home in London or people sleeping rough.

“For far too many local people, affordable housing is simply out of reach. We should expect more from both national and local politicians to find solutions that work for all sections of society here in Barnsley.”

To read the Yorkshire and the Humber Home Truths 2017/18 report in full visit www.housing.org.uk/hometruths

People living in Sheffield need a 62% pay rise to afford to buy a home

The average full-time worker in Sheffield now needs a staggering pay rise of 62% just to afford a mortgage on a typical home in the region, a new report from the National Housing Federation reveals today.

According to the ‘Yorkshire and the Humber Home Truths 2017/18’ report, those earning any less than £40,580 a year are now priced out of buying the average home in the area.

Despite regional house prices being lower than the national average, the combination of low wages, an above-average unemployment rate and job insecurity is resulting in an acute housing crisis in the area.

Local salaries have failed to keep up with house prices, meaning the average home in Sheffield – costing £177,538 – is now over seven times the average yearly income of £24,991

The report also exposes the severe shortfall of new homes in recent years. Between 2012 and 2016, there were nearly 36,000 too few homes built across Yorkshire and the Humber to keep up with demand, with South Yorkshire alone being 6,500 homes short.

South Yorkshire Housing Association has plans to build 1,180 homes by 2021, and in 2017 alone built 73 new homes in the region.

Tony Stacey, Chief Executive of South Yorkshire Housing Association, said: “We tend to talk as though there is just one housing crisis, but it takes many different forms. It is not just about the impossibility of affording a home in London or people sleeping rough.

“For far too many local people, affordable housing is simply out of reach. We should expect more from both national and local politicians to find solutions that work for all sections of society here in Sheffield.”

To read the Yorkshire and the Humber Home Truths 2017/18 report in full visit www.housing.org.uk/hometruths

Election candidates invited to talk about solving housing crisis

South Yorkshire Housing Association is joining hundreds of housing associations across the country calling on candidates standing in the General Election to make housing one of their top priorities.

It comes as the National Housing Federation launches a week of action for the sector to come together and highlight the role it can play in solving the housing crisis.

Between 2011 and 2015 there were 37,000 too few homes built to keep up with demand in Yorkshire alone.

Coupled with the average home in the region costing seven times the average income, and private rent charges soaring, the need for affordable housing has never been higher.

Housing associations are well placed to build the homes we so desperately need, with South Yorkshire Housing Association already having committed to building 1,180 new homes over the next five years – but we can do more with the right backing.

The association is calling on all local candidates standing in Sheffield City Region seats in the General Election to call for funding and land to be made available for housing associations to ramp up the supply of new affordable housing.

We’re also asking candidates to commit to fight against the planned Local Housing Allowance cap, which will lead to certain closure for supported housing for vulnerable people in the Sheffield City Region.

Tony Stacey, Chief Executive of South Yorkshire Housing Association, said: “There’s no way around it, we’re in the middle of a real housing crisis. We’re not building anywhere near enough new homes to meet demand and it’s exactly why homelessness is on the rise.

“The message is simple. Housing associations are ready to do their bit to help solve the crisis, but we need support. We’re inviting every candidate standing in a Sheffield City Region seat in the General Election to come and meet with us, talk about housing and how we can work together.”

To arrange a meeting with Tony Stacey please email t.stacey@syha.co.uk

People living in Barnsley need a 26% pay rise to afford to buy a home

The average full-time worker in Barnsley now needs a staggering pay rise of 26% just to afford a mortgage on a typical home in the region, a new report from the National Housing Federation reveals today.

According to the ‘Yorkshire and the Humber Home Truths 2016/17’ report, those earning any less than £29,809 a year are now priced out of buying the average home in the area.

Despite regional house prices being lower than the national average, the combination of low wages, an above-average unemployment rate and job insecurity is resulting in an acute housing crisis in the area.

Local salaries have failed to keep up with house prices, meaning the average home in Barnsley – costing £130,413 – is now over five and a half times the average yearly income of £23,670.

The report also exposes the severe shortfall of new homes in recent years. Between 2011 and 2015, there were over 37,000 too few homes built across Yorkshire and the Humber to keep up with demand, while cities like Sheffield were nearly 7,000 homes short.

The housing association sector is working to end the region’s crisis, completing nearly 1,800 new homes and starting work on over 1,600 more during 2015/16.

Tony Stacey, Chief Executive of South Yorkshire Housing Association, said: “The message is simple – we need to build more homes in our region. Homes that are genuinely affordable and offer different types of tenure, whether that is to buy, rent or shared ownership.

“We’re a relatively small organisation, but we’re doing our bit to help. We’ve got plans to build 1,180 new homes in our region over the next five years, but with the planned Government cuts to the Local Housing Allowance, this will undermine our entire development plan at a time when housing associations are perfectly placed to ramp up supply.

Jo Allen, the National Housing Federation’s External Affairs Manager for Yorkshire and the Humber, said: “It is clear that Yorkshire and the Humber is suffering from an acute housing crisis and these truly distressing stats simply reaffirm that fact – we simply must get building more genuinely affordable homes.”

To read the Yorkshire and the Humber Home Truths 2016/17 report in full visit www.housing.org.uk/hometruths.

People living in Doncaster need a 40% pay rise to afford to buy a home

The average full-time worker in Sheffield now needs a staggering pay rise of 40% just to afford a mortgage on a typical home in the region, a new report from the National Housing Federation reveals today.

According to the ‘Yorkshire and the Humber Home Truths 2016/17’ report, those earning any less than £32,500 a year are now priced out of buying the average home in the area.

Despite regional house prices being lower than the national average, the combination of low wages, an above-average unemployment rate and job insecurity is resulting in an acute housing crisis in the area.

Local salaries have failed to keep up with house prices, meaning the average home in Doncaster – costing £142,189 – is now over six times the average yearly income of £23,161.

The report also exposes the severe shortfall of new homes in recent years. Between 2011 and 2015, there were over 37,000 too few homes built across Yorkshire and the Humber to keep up with demand, while cities like Sheffield were nearly 7,000 homes short.

The housing association sector is working to end the region’s crisis, completing nearly 1,800 new homes and starting work on over 1,600 more during 2015/16.

Tony Stacey, Chief Executive of South Yorkshire Housing Association, said: “The message is simple – we need to build more homes in our region. Homes that are genuinely affordable and offer different types of tenure, whether that is to buy, rent or shared ownership.

“We’re a relatively small organisation, but we’re doing our bit to help. We’ve got plans to build 1,180 new homes in our region over the next five years, but with the planned Government cuts to the Local Housing Allowance, this will undermine our entire development plan at a time when housing associations are perfectly placed to ramp up supply.

Jo Allen, the National Housing Federation’s External Affairs Manager for Yorkshire and the Humber, said: “It is clear that Yorkshire and the Humber is suffering from an acute housing crisis and these truly distressing stats simply reaffirm that fact – we simply must get building more genuinely affordable homes.”

To read the Yorkshire and the Humber Home Truths 2016/17 report in full visit www.housing.org.uk/hometruths.

People living in Rotherham need a 45% pay rise to afford to buy a home

The average full-time worker in Rotherham now needs a staggering pay rise of 45% just to afford a mortgage on a typical home in the region, a new report from the National Housing Federation reveals today.

According to the ‘Yorkshire and the Humber Home Truths 2016/17’ report, those earning any less than £33,535 a year are now priced out of buying the average home in the area.

Despite regional house prices being lower than the national average, the combination of low wages, an above-average unemployment rate and job insecurity is resulting in an acute housing crisis in the area.

Local salaries have failed to keep up with house prices, meaning the average home in Sheffield – costing £146,715 – is now over six times the average yearly income of £23,187.

The report also exposes the severe shortfall of new homes in recent years. Between 2011 and 2015, there were over 37,000 too few homes built across Yorkshire and the Humber to keep up with demand, while cities like Sheffield were nearly 7,000 homes short.

The housing association sector is working to end the region’s crisis, completing nearly 1,800 new homes and starting work on over 1,600 more during 2015/16.

Tony Stacey, Chief Executive of South Yorkshire Housing Association, said: “The message is simple – we need to build more homes in our region. Homes that are genuinely affordable and offer different types of tenure, whether that is to buy, rent or shared ownership.

“We’re a relatively small organisation, but we’re doing our bit to help. We’ve got plans to build 1,180 new homes in our region over the next five years, but with the planned Government cuts to the Local Housing Allowance, this will undermine our entire development plan at a time when housing associations are perfectly placed to ramp up supply.

Jo Allen, the National Housing Federation’s External Affairs Manager for Yorkshire and the Humber, said: “It is clear that Yorkshire and the Humber is suffering from an acute housing crisis and these truly distressing stats simply reaffirm that fact – we simply must get building more genuinely affordable homes.”

To read the Yorkshire and the Humber Home Truths 2016/17 report in full visit www.housing.org.uk/hometruths.